It's The All Australian Defender!

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278,440 notes

qalaba:

miscegene:

summertimelovegirl:

blue-author:

gallifrey-feels:

awkwardsmilememe:

THIS CROW FUCKING UNDERSTANDS WATER DISPLACEMENT. WHY THE FUCK DO I HAVE TO BE TOLD EVERY YEAR BY A TEACHER HOW WATER DISPLACEMENT WORKS. DO THEY THINK I’M LESS INTELLIGENT THAN A FUCKING CROW? FUCKING DONE.


Crows discovered the principle of displacement in the third century BC, when the philosopher Awkimedes, upon noticing the level of his bird bath rose in proportion with the amount of his body that was submerged, reportedly exclaimed “EURECAW!” and flew through the streets of Athens shouting his discovery.

EURECAW

Tumblr will believe anything smfh. The law that’s being described is Archimedes’ Principle and Archimedes of Syracuse(the guy who discovered this) said Eureka, not Eurecaw.

qalaba:

miscegene:

summertimelovegirl:

blue-author:

gallifrey-feels:

awkwardsmilememe:

THIS CROW FUCKING UNDERSTANDS WATER DISPLACEMENT. WHY THE FUCK DO I HAVE TO BE TOLD EVERY YEAR BY A TEACHER HOW WATER DISPLACEMENT WORKS. DO THEY THINK I’M LESS INTELLIGENT THAN A FUCKING CROW? FUCKING DONE.

Crows discovered the principle of displacement in the third century BC, when the philosopher Awkimedes, upon noticing the level of his bird bath rose in proportion with the amount of his body that was submerged, reportedly exclaimed “EURECAW!” and flew through the streets of Athens shouting his discovery.

EURECAW

Tumblr will believe anything smfh. The law that’s being described is Archimedes’ Principle and Archimedes of Syracuse(the guy who discovered this) said Eureka, not Eurecaw.

(Source: 4gifs, via shutuproseshaw)

275 notes

joerojasburke:

But seriously, how quickly could a giant sauropod dinosaur react to an attack on a body part 150 feet from its brain? The excellent blog SV-POW! has the answer:

… sauropods really did have individual sensory nerve cells that ran from their extremities (tip of tail, soles of feet)–and from the rest of their skin–to their brainstems. In the longest sauropods, these cells were probably something like 150 feet long, and may have been the longest cells in the history of life. We haven’t found any fossils of these nerves and almost certainly never will, but we can be sure that sauropods had them because all vertebrates do, from hagfish on up. That’s just how we’re built. So how long does it take to send a nerve impulse 150 feet? The fastest nerve conduction velocities are in the neighborhood of 120 meters per second, so a signal from the very tip of the tail in a 150-foot sauropod would take about half a second to reach the brain…[continue reading]

Cartoon by Ed McLachlan, Punch magazine, 1981

joerojasburke:

But seriously, how quickly could a giant sauropod dinosaur react to an attack on a body part 150 feet from its brain? The excellent blog SV-POW! has the answer:

… sauropods really did have individual sensory nerve cells that ran from their extremities (tip of tail, soles of feet)–and from the rest of their skin–to their brainstems. In the longest sauropods, these cells were probably something like 150 feet long, and may have been the longest cells in the history of life. We haven’t found any fossils of these nerves and almost certainly never will, but we can be sure that sauropods had them because all vertebrates do, from hagfish on up. That’s just how we’re built. So how long does it take to send a nerve impulse 150 feet? The fastest nerve conduction velocities are in the neighborhood of 120 meters per second, so a signal from the very tip of the tail in a 150-foot sauropod would take about half a second to reach the brain…[continue reading]

Cartoon by Ed McLachlan, Punch magazine, 1981

(via scientificillustration)